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Daylight Savings in the Garden

Time to Plant Your Flower Bulbs!

The clocks are turning back on Sunday, November 6th, and I’m sure most people are planning to sleep through their extra hour. But there’s a saying, “The early bird gets the worm,” and that means rewards come to those who put in the effort. It’s an extra hour of precious time, and we often don’t seem to have enough time in our lives, especially to do things that we’ve really been wanting to do – like getting out in the garden and planting bulbs.

Easy to remember, Daylight Savings is a great opportunity to plant fall bulbs. You might think early November is too late, but as long as the soil is workable you can plant bulbs. The cooler ground also offers ideal conditions for bulbs to settle into and grow.

So make a day of it, cook up a batch of chili or soup, and get the whole family involved. And be sure to plant something new in your garden, something special that will remind you of the day, so that when it blooms next spring you’ll see the reward and be glad you made the effort.

Family Gardening in Fall
Make it a family garden day!

Time to Plant Your Flower Bulbs!

The clocks are turning back on Sunday, November 6th, and I’m sure most people are planning to sleep through their extra hour. But there’s a saying, “The early bird gets the worm,” and that means rewards come to those who put in the effort. It’s an extra hour of precious time, and we often don’t seem to have enough time in our lives, especially to do things that we’ve really been wanting to do – like getting out in the garden and planting bulbs.

Family Gardening in Fall
Make it a family garden day!

Easy to remember, Daylight Savings is a great opportunity to plant fall bulbs. You might think early November is too late, but as long as the soil is workable you can plant bulbs. The cooler ground also offers ideal conditions for bulbs to settle into and grow.

So make a day of it, cook up a batch of chili or soup, and get the whole family involved. And be sure to plant something new in your garden, something special that will remind you of the day, so that when it blooms next spring you’ll see the reward and be glad you made the effort.

Allium Summer Drummer

Allium Summer Drummer – Ornamental Onion

Summer Drummer reaches for the sky, growing over 2 m or 6 ft. tall. It is the tallest allium, bearing foliage not only at its base, but along its robust purple stem. July through August, it’s topped by a huge 20 cm (8-10”) densely packed globe of frosty purple and white florets. Ushering in the summer, this allium is adored by bees and butterflies. The green stems transition to purple as it ages and stands sentry over the garden. Plant this garden giant in groupings of 3-5 bulbs for the best effect. If you want to encourage young gardeners, this is a fun bulb to plant and watch to see just how tall it can grow. Hardy to Zone 3.

Allium Summer Drummer – Ornamental Onion

Allium Summer Drummer

Summer Drummer reaches for the sky, growing over 2 m or 6 ft. tall. It is the tallest allium, bearing foliage not only at its base, but along its robust purple stem. July through August, it’s topped by a huge 20 cm (8-10”) densely packed globe of frosty purple and white florets. Ushering in the summer, this allium is adored by bees and butterflies. The green stems transition to purple as it ages and stands sentry over the garden. Plant this garden giant in groupings of 3-5 bulbs for the best effect. If you want to encourage young gardeners, this is a fun bulb to plant and watch to see just how tall it can grow. Hardy to Zone 3.

Emerus Foxtail Lily

Eremurus – Foxtail Lily

Eremurus are impressive, dramatic perennials guaranteed to gather attention and comments. Your neighbours will be asking “Ooooh…What are those?” Also known as Foxtail Lilies, they can grow to heights well over 1.5 m (5 ft.) tall. In full bloom, the flower spires look furry like a fox’s tail, in orange, soft pink, yellow, and creamy white shades. Their stance is graceful, without the need for staking. Their roots look like a starfish, radiating out from a central crown, and can measure up to 60 cm (24”) across. Best planted in the fall, foxtail lilies require a full sun location and fertile, well-draining soil. Give them plenty of space in garden beds and borders; about 30-60 cm (1-2 ft.) between plants. Blooming late June to July, they make great companions for taller alliums. They dislike being disturbed, so leave them be, once they are established you’ll be rewarded with years of simply stunning blooms.

Eremurus – Foxtail Lily

Emerus Foxtail Lily

Eremurus are impressive, dramatic perennials guaranteed to gather attention and comments. Your neighbours will be asking “Ooooh…What are those?” Also known as Foxtail Lilies, they can grow to heights well over 1.5 m (5 ft.) tall. In full bloom, the flower spires look furry like a fox’s tail, in orange, soft pink, yellow, and creamy white shades. Their stance is graceful, without the need for staking. Their roots look like a starfish, radiating out from a central crown, and can measure up to 60 cm (24”) across. Best planted in the fall, foxtail lilies require a full sun location and fertile, well-draining soil. Give them plenty of space in garden beds and borders; about 30-60 cm (1-2 ft.) between plants. Blooming late June to July, they make great companions for taller alliums. They dislike being disturbed, so leave them be, once they are established you’ll be rewarded with years of simply stunning blooms.

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